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Jenny asks…

This is my college application essay, what are my chances of getting into colleges?

I would like to share with you something about my current medical situation. Ordinarily I would not do so, as I am an intensely private person, but I now accept that my physical limitations have quite possibly impacted my high school performance in a negative manner, and I feel that it is only fair that you have this information. Therefore, I am reluctantly going to allow access to information that I would never, otherwise, speak of.

For the past several years, I have been afflicted by a physical situation that has sometimes interfered with my ability to focus, both in the classroom and out. I do not wish to be too specific about the symptoms of my disease, except to say that they are digestive in nature and sometimes require me to spend long periods of time in the Ladies’ Room. Despite my terrible discomfort, I refused to accept that there might be something wrong with me, and would not seek treatment. I know now that I should have been less determined to suffer in silence and more willing to accept help. Finally, my parents insisted on bringing the matter to the attention of a physician. I was tested, over a period of several weeks, for colon cancer, Crohn’s Disease, intestinal obstructions, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett’s esophagus, Heliocobacter pylori (commonly known as ulcer), celiac sprue (commonly known as wheat allergy), lactose intolerance, gallstones, bile duct stones, sclerosing cholangitis (the narrowing of the bile ducts), “Sphincter of Oddi” dysfunction and pancreatitis. You can imagine how relieved I was to learn that I had none of these terrible diseases.

Finally, I received the diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).

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Irritable bowel syndrome
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about a functional disorder. For bowel inflammation, see Inflammatory bowel disease.
Irritable bowel syndrome
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 K58.
ICD-9 564.1
DiseasesDB 30638
MedlinePlus 000246
eMedicine med/1190
MeSH D043183

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS or spastic colon) is a diagnosis of exclusion. It is a functional bowel disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain, discomfort, bloating, and alteration of bowel habits in the absence of any detectable organic cause.[1] In some cases, the symptoms are relieved by bowel movements.[2] Diarrhea or constipation may predominate, or they may alternate (classified as IBS-D, IBS-C or IBS-A, respectively). IBS may begin after an infection (post-infectious, IBS-PI), a stressful life event, or onset of maturity without any other medical indicators.

Although there is no cure for IBS, there are treatments that attempt to relieve symptoms, including dietary adjustments, medication and psychological interventions. Patient education and a good doctor-patient relationship are also important.[2]

Several conditions may present as IBS including coeliac disease, fructose malabsorption,[3] mild infections, parasitic infections like giardiasis,[4] several inflammatory bowel diseases, functional chronic constipation, and chronic functional abdominal pain. In IBS, routine clinical tests yield no abnormalities, although the bowels may be more sensitive to certain stimuli, such as balloon insufflation testing. The exact cause of IBS is unknown. The most common theory is that IBS is a disorder of the interaction between the brain and the gastrointestinal tract, although there may also be abnormalities in the gut flora or the immune system.[5][6]

IBS does not lead to more serious conditions in most patients.[7][8][9][10][11] However, it is a source of chronic pain, fatigue, and other symptoms and contributes to work absenteeism.[12][13] Researchers have reported that the high prevalence of IBS,[14][15][16] in conjunction with increased costs, produces a disease with a high societal cost.[17] It is also regarded as a chronic illness and can dramatically affect the quality of a sufferer’s life.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Classification
* 2 Symptoms
* 3 Causes
o 3.1 Active infections
* 4 Diagnosis
o 4.1 Differential diagnosis
o 4.2 Misdiagnosis
o 4.3 Comorbidities
* 5 Management
o 5.1 Diet
o 5.2 Medication
o 5.3 Psychotherapy
o 5.4 Alternative medicine
* 6 Epidemiology
* 7 History
* 8 Economics
* 9 Research
* 10 See also
* 11 References
* 12 External links

health answers:

Um… Did you copy 3/4 of your essay from Wikipedia?

Ken asks…

THIS IS MY COLLEGE ESSAY, IS IT READY TO BE SENT TO COLLEGES?

I would like to share with you something about my current medical situation. Ordinarily I would not do so, as I am an intensely private person, but I now accept that my physical limitations have quite possibly impacted my high school performance in a negative manner, and I feel that it is only fair that you have this information. Therefore, I am reluctantly going to allow access to information that I would never, otherwise, speak of.

For the past several years, I have been afflicted by a physical situation that has sometimes interfered with my ability to focus, both in the classroom and out. I do not wish to be too specific about the symptoms of my disease, except to say that they are digestive in nature and sometimes require me to spend long periods of time in the Ladies’ Room. Despite my terrible discomfort, I refused to accept that there might be something wrong with me, and would not seek treatment. I know now that I should have been less determined to suffer in silence and more willing to accept help. Finally, my parents insisted on bringing the matter to the attention of a physician. I was tested, over a period of several weeks, for colon cancer, Crohn’s Disease, intestinal obstructions, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett’s esophagus, Heliocobacter pylori (commonly known as ulcer), celiac sprue (commonly known as wheat allergy), lactose intolerance, gallstones, bile duct stones, sclerosing cholangitis (the narrowing of the bile ducts), “Sphincter of Oddi” dysfunction and pancreatitis. You can imagine how relieved I was to learn that I had none of these terrible diseases.

Finally, I received the diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).

Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about a functional disorder. For bowel inflammation, see Inflammatory bowel disease.
Irritable bowel syndrome
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 K58.
ICD-9 564.1
DiseasesDB 30638
MedlinePlus 000246
eMedicine med/1190
MeSH D043183

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS or spastic colon) is a diagnosis of exclusion. It is a functional bowel disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain, discomfort, bloating, and alteration of bowel habits in the absence of any detectable organic cause.[1] In some cases, the symptoms are relieved by bowel movements.[2] Diarrhea or constipation may predominate, or they may alternate (classified as IBS-D, IBS-C or IBS-A, respectively). IBS may begin after an infection (post-infectious, IBS-PI), a stressful life event, or onset of maturity without any other medical indicators.

Although there is no cure for IBS, there are treatments that attempt to relieve symptoms, including dietary adjustments, medication and psychological interventions. Patient education and a good doctor-patient relationship are also important.[2]

Several conditions may present as IBS including celiac disease, fructose malabsorption,[3] mild infections, parasitic infections like giardiasis,[4] several inflammatory bowel diseases, functional chronic constipation, and chronic functional abdominal pain. In IBS, routine clinical tests yield no abnormalities, although the bowels may be more sensitive to certain stimuli, such as balloon insufflation testing. The exact cause of IBS is unknown. The most common theory is that IBS is a disorder of the interaction between the brain and the gastrointestinal tract, although there may also be abnormalities in the gut flora or the immune system.[5][6]

IBS does not lead to more serious conditions in most patients.[7][8][9][10][11] However, it is a source of chronic pain, fatigue, and other symptoms, and it increases a patient’s medical costs,[12][13] and contributes to work absenteeism.[14][15] Researchers have reported that the high prevalence of IBS,[16][17][18] in conjunction with increased costs, produces a disease with a high societal cost.[19] It is also regarded as a chronic illness and can dramatically affect the quality of a sufferer’s life.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Classification
* 2 Symptoms
* 3 Causes
o 3.1 Active infections
* 4 Diagnosis
o 4.1 Differential diagnosis
o 4.2 Misdiagnosis
o 4.3 Comorbidities
* 5 Management
o 5.1 Diet
o 5.2 Medication
o 5.3 Psychotherapy
o 5.4 Alternative medicine
* 6 Epidemiology
* 7 History
* 8 Economics
* 9 Research
* 10 See also
* 11 References
* 12 External links

health answers:

Once you have been given a clear diagnosis of IBS then you will have to figure out what is causing the IBS symptoms. Many IBS triggers can be found in the food you eat and the lifestyle you lead. The book “The IBS Formula” gives you an up to date look at IBS, what causes it and how to take control of your life from these symptoms. I take Digestive Advantage pills for IBS from Gentech for my IBS. They work great. The cheapest place I have found to get them is Amazon.com. If you order them through amazon’s subscription service they deliver them with free shipping. I take 1 or 2 a day and usually with a meal. It initially takes about 2-3 weeks for this to get into your system before it starts to work. So you will not notice any benefits till after the 2 or 3 weeks. Also many IBS sufferers take a fiber supplement. The other thing that helps is to get on an exercise routine. Sweating will help to get the toxins out of your body, that are causing the IBS symptoms. Stay away from greasy and sugary foods, these seem to cause IBS symptoms. For more information on IBS visit TheIBSFormula.com. Hope this helps!

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